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Tech Tool Review – Telly

April 23, 2013

Published here on April 18, 2013

Telly (the rebranded Twitvid) is a video sharing service which pulls content from CNN, YouTube, Vimeo, ESPN, and more. Its goal, according to its website, is “to only play videos you’ll love.” It attempts to utilize user data, garnered from its 7 million users’ activity within the app, on Facebook and on Twitter, to provide users with a stream of videos they’ll love.

I visited the service and my stream consisted of a music video, a video about a 100 pound candy bar, a movie trailer and a video about cats. Because the site had no user data from me, a message came up and told me that Telly would play the most popular videos that day. The idea is no different from YouTube’s “trending” page, except that Telly also incorporates several other video platforms (besides just YouTube). Telly’s Twitter feed consists of links to 15-20 videos a day. I will admit that most of them looked interesting.

Bottom line, though, this app is all about user experience. Its focus is entirely on video discovery, not video production. It’s like the Huffington Post of videos. There’s no function (at least that I could find) to market anything. True, an organization could create an account and start sharing videos, but I don’t see how that would produce any benefits. The same outcome can be obtained by linking to these videos via Twitter and LinkedIn.

Pros:

  • It’s got a great interface (at least this is true of the web version) and is very intuitive.
  • The video recommendation is surprisingly spot-on — and I don’t even have an account. I’m sure my experience would only improve if I were to start participating and giving the site data.

Cons:

  • There’s no clear way to use it as a marketing tool.
  • Its brand is fun and relaxed (remember the cat video?). This is probably a little too casual for any B2B brands.

Consensus: An organization can use Telly like a video-based Google Reader because it does a really good job of providing interesting content, but there’s no way to push out content in a marketable way.

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